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Years 4 to 6

The video below is the second in our series of Vocabulary Booster classes. Each week, a new topic is covered which will expand your child’s vocabulary and introduce them to hundreds of new words. 

This video is accompanied by a set of vocabulary worksheets, which provides examples and activities to boost your child’s learning. 

You can download and print your pack for maximum benefit when following the video.


DOWNLOAD VOCABULARY WORKSHEET PACK 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmGI69uK5Ss

Activity 1: Matching Root words and Affixes

The first activity in this week’s worksheet involves matching affixes and suffixes with their meanings. This develops your child’s ability to decode the definitions of new words; a handy skill when encountering new texts or vocabulary tasks.

 

Below is a list of the roots and affixes followed by the definition and some examples of when they are used.

“Re-“ means back

reverse, recall, regress.

Pro-” means forward.

progress, proceed.

Vacat-” means empty.

vacation (empty house), vacate.

Vis-” means see.

visible, visited, television, visibility

Potent” means power.

potential, potentiate, potent

-Tain” means to hold.

contain, maintain, sustain, detain

De-” means away.

deflect, defend, devote

-Cede” means go.

exceed, proceed, recede, succeed, intercede

Activity 2 – Definitions

Potential: having the ability to do something (succeed, for example) in the future.

Potent: very strong, having great power or influence.

Vacant: empty.

Era: a specific period of time.

Dispute: A disagreement or argument.

Span: The distance or length of something. For example, hand span or life span.


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Activity 3 – Synonyms

The words below are matched with the correct synonyms. Understanding and matching these synonyms means the children are more likely to remember new words and definitions.

Period – Era

Potent – Powerful

Ability – Potential

Unoccupied – Vacant

Quarrel – Dispute

Activity 4 – Tain words

This activity involves writing the definitions of words that end in “-tain”. Some clues are given on the worksheet to help and the correct definitions are written below.

Retain: to keep hold of something.

For example, a retainer holds your teeth in place.

Detain: (de- meaning away) to delay; to keep someone from progressing.

Sustain: 1. to support or hold up something from below  2. To keep going.

Sustenance: something to keep you going, eg food.

Maintain: to keep something in good condition.

Obtain: to get; acquire.

Tenacious: to keep a firm hold of something; a thought, dream, object or thing.

Synonyms for tenacious include determined and persevering.

Untenable: Impossible to defend or keep going.

If a situation becomes untenable the it is unable to continue.

Activity 5 – Cloze test

Your child can now complete the sentences on the worksheet using the words at the top of the page. 

Discussing the definitions of each word with your child before starting may be useful. Below are two definitions which have not been previously discussed and will be useful for this task.

Meticulous: taking great care over small details.

Coup (coup d’état): a violent overthrow of the government.

The answers to this activity can be found in the video above.

Activity 6 – Using Words in Sentences

Using the new words your child has learnt when writing sentences is a great way to confirm their understanding and helps them to remember the word in future.

Below are some examples of correct sentences.

A pool is high maintenance to look after.

I was detained at school during detention.

I sustained a painful injury while playing football.

The death of Mufasa in ‘The Lion King’ marked the end of an era.

I looked to see whether the toilet was occupied or vacant.

I needed the details of the addressee before I could send my letter.

My mum is very meticulous about the appearance of our garden.

The man next-door has lived in his house for over a decade.

His greatest ambition was to become a dancer.

The police dog refused to release its tenacious grip on the robber’s ankle.

You must show your ticket before you can proceed to enter the museum.


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